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The Queen’s Wings

The Queen of England celebrated her Diamond Jubilee to mark 60 years as the country’s monarch in June 2012. The Midlands National Flying Club organised a race from Fougeres in France to lay tribute to this great occasion. The decision was made by the Club’s committee to not only arrange the race but also to make a film of the event.

American Jim Jenner the world famed Pigeon film maker was contacted and a partnership was formed. Mr Jenner came over with his assistant Robbe Lindsay and over a two week period hours of filming took place. This has resulted in a well received and much acclaimed works. We are reliably informed that Her Majesty has seen the film and is delighted with the portrayal. Without wishing to spoil the story it is a film with a true ‘fairy tale’ ending.

Queen Elizabeth has a long and keen interest in Pigeon Racing and through her Loft Manager Peter Farrow has her ‘Royal Lofts’ in  Sandringham and races successfully to this day. The Royal family has a distinguished history and strong connections to the sport of Pigeon Racing. The Queen’s Grandfather King George V was a real fanatic after getting gifted pigeons from his cousin and close friend King Leopold of Belgium. Proof of his love of pigeon racing is confirmed by the fact that he awarded several King’s Cups to large British Pigeon Clubs.

There are two other great benefits to pigeon racing of ‘The Queen’s Wings’ beside’ paying our tribute to England’s very popular Monarch. The first is that it elevates the standing of the Pigeon Sport and secondly and even more importantly is the fact that it is a proven fact that pigeons and animals in general are of major importance to the future well being of today’s young children. Extensive studies have been carried out at American Universities and have shown that children brought up from within an inner city environment can often suffer from a condition called ‘Nature Deprivation Deficiency’.  The ideal cure to this is a closer contact with live animals and pigeons in particular are an excellent way to ‘bridge’ this gap. Schools in England are now realising this fact and one or two have now introduced a pigeon loft on their premises. One such school is ‘Kingsmead Technical College’ whose pupils are both reaping the benefit from pigeons and also briefly highlighted in the film.

The main aim of ‘The Queen’s Wings’ is to try and educate the non-pigeon flying population to the educational merits of the wonderful sport of Pigeon racing. A few keen people are desperately trying to get the film introduced into schools Nationwide to highlight what the humble ‘bird of peace’ has to offer. If a better balanced adult is the end result then a small loft of pigeons is a good investment. I am sure all pigeon fanciers will wish the Midlands National and their helpers well in this laudable crusade because the very future of the sport many depend upon it and similar innovations.

For anyone wishing to learn more about both the film and the Club’s aims can look on the Midlands National Flying Club website: WWW.MNFC.org.uk